PLUTO’S GATE – GATE TO HELL AND WHY ITS FORBIDDEN FOR PEOPLE

PLUTO’S GATE - GATE TO HELL AND WHY ITS FORBIDDEN FOR PEOPLE

Gate to hell

The “gate to hell” was found in Turkey by Italian archaeologists.

The gate also known as Pluto’s Gate or Ploutonion in Greek, Plutonium in Latin, was found in the ancient Phrygian city of Hierapolis, which is now called Pamukkale. Hierapolis was founded around 190 B.C. by Eumenes II, King of Pergamum and given to Rome in 133 B.C. It became a vibrant Roman city, complete with a theater, temples and popular hot springs that were believed to have healing powers.

Ancient sources said the cave was filled with legal vapors and was known as the portal to the underworld in Greek and Roman mythology.

PLUTO’S GATE – GATE TO HELL AND WHY ITS FORBIDDEN FOR PEOPLE???

Religious place

A cave ancient Romans believed to be a gate to the underworld was so deadly that it killed all animals who entered its proximity, while not harming the human priests who led them. Now scientists believe they have figured out why – a concentrated cloud of carbon dioxide that suffocated those who breathed it.

Pluto’s gate was a religious place in Turkey. It was discovered by archaeologists in 1965 and is said to have been a place where many ritual sacrifices were made for the Pluto, the Roman god of the underworld. The place where this was built is quite bizarre. So bizarre that you are not allowed to go there anymore.

Toxic gases

Pluto’s Gate is built on top of a cave that releases poisonous gases and is seen as a ritual passage to the underworld. Animal sacrifices were common. In the past many people didn’t dare to go to the place because they thought it was a dangerous.

Pluto’s gate was built around 2nd century BC and has been abandoned since the 6th century AD.
According to a well-known ancient Greek historian, no one could survive there. He wrote that the vapor that came out of the cave was so foggy and dense that you can hardly see the ground. To test how dangerous it was, he threw sparrows inside. The sparrows died immediately.

When an animal ritual took place, They threw the animals down into the cave, after which they lifted the animals up again with ropes that were tied around the body. Today the fumes are still very poisonous. This was discovered when archaeologists kept an eye on the birds that flew by. Many birds were attracted by the heat that the fumes generated. The birds suffocated after breathing in the fumes.

One of thirteen entraces to hell

There are 13 places on earth that people believed were entrances to hell and Pluto’s Gate is one of them. Although Hierapolis itself was discovered in 1965, it was not until 2012 that the archaeologists found two marble statues by a closed off cave: a serpent, and Kerberos (Cerberus) which is the three-headed dog that, according to myth, guards the gate of hell.

Pluto’s Gate has attracted many pilgrims from all around the world to make sacrifices to Pluto. Adding the healing benefits of the hot springs, Hieropolis became a vibrant city of healing and religion in its time. The hot springs have been used as a spa since the 2nd century BCE.

Since many ill people come here to use the spa, they ended up staying until they died. The Christian apostle Philip was one of them. Therefore, Hieropolis has one of the largest and the best preserved necropolis with more than 1200 graves. There was also a large population of Jewish people reaching 50,000 living in Hierapolis around 60 BCE.

Priests with superpowers


During the early years of the gate’s construction, two priests crawled into the cave to prove that they were immune to the gas. This would only have been possible if they held their breath or crawled to air bubbles with oxygen. Carbon dioxide is heavier than air, creating air bubbles. People thought it was a miracle and believed that the priests were infused with superior powers.

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